Megalith

Detail - ©Pierre Bona / CC-BY-SA Detail - ©Pierre Bona / CC-BY-SA

The chapels The tradition says the two neighbouring chapels of San Quilico and Santa Maria were raised by two masons, father and son. The father was in charge of the Quilico’s building work, the son...

Filitosa IX - ©Sy.forester / CC-BY-SA Filitosa IX - ©Sy.forester / CC-BY-SA

A very important site In 1946, Charles-Antoine Cesari discovered the site for the first time, in the plot of land he owned in order to raise his own house! In 1954, archaeologists even discovered a...

The stone - ©Hogne / CC-BY-SA The stone - ©Hogne / CC-BY-SA

A pretty nice grave! Near Draguignan, here’s the dolmen (dol means "table" and men "stone" in Breton), the most important one in Provence, 2 metres high! Here they call it the "Fairies stone"...

The statue - ©Img / Public domain The statue - ©Img / Public domain

The statue After Tavera and Filitosa, here’s another Corsican place with "statue-menhir". This one is an anthropomorphous statue, about 2 metres high. Described for the first time by historian and...

The statue - ©Royonx / CC-BY-SA The statue - ©Royonx / CC-BY-SA

The discovery dates back to 1961. They found it buried, lying down at about 1000 metres deep. It’s an anthropomorphic statue about 2,42 metres, which looks like the statues of the prehistorical site...

The tumulus - ©Aeleftherios / CC-BY-SA The tumulus - ©Aeleftherios / CC-BY-SA

The tumulus was called bosse de la Prière ("Prayer's bump") in Saint-Nazaire area! It was discovered in 1873. This huge, so huge megalithic building has 2 funeral rooms (one of them used to be a...

The cairn - ©Myrabella / WikimediaCommons / CC-BY-SA The cairn - ©Myrabella / WikimediaCommons / CC-BY-SA

Gavrinis is a little island where stands this strange megalith, which used to mark a funerary site. Gavrinis' one dates back to 3 500 BC; its 100 metres long and 8 metres high. A long corridor leads...

The stones - ©Steffen Heilfort / CC-BY-SA The stones - ©Steffen Heilfort / CC-BY-SA

Carnac... such a mystery! Historians said lots of cranky theories about those alignments. Some said it was Roman soldiers turned into stone by saint Cornély, some said those huge stones were pickets...

And also!